Showing posts tagged photos

elita0ne:

faithlessbeliever:

scienceoftheidiot:

I could look at these gifs for hours…

 this is so calming

Same here.

(Source: angelintherain)

(Reblogged from spoopyspag)

danijelivic:

cloudy reflection

(Reblogged from danijelivic)
triptophobias:

backwardsorbust:

ellavictorious:

That’s fucked up. That’s real fucked up. That’s some ice spider shit and I do not approve.

That is the sickest shit ever

i just imagined a tiny little ice-spider on the mirror singing ‘let it go’ as he builds his little icy webby fortress.

triptophobias:

backwardsorbust:

ellavictorious:

That’s fucked up. That’s real fucked up. That’s some ice spider shit and I do not approve.

That is the sickest shit ever

i just imagined a tiny little ice-spider on the mirror singing ‘let it go’ as he builds his little icy webby fortress.

(Reblogged from hellotailor)
juliendouvier:

More images of this series here

juliendouvier:

More images of this series here

(Reblogged from juliendouvier)

danijelivic:

chasing light

| Växjö, Sweden |

(Reblogged from danijelivic)
(Reblogged from gingerhaze)

post-mitotic:

while these may appear to be little balls of lava, 

they’re actually toad eggs

disappointing

reflected light (50x)

credit: Christian Gautier

HOW IS THAT DISAPPOINTING

I mean, monster lava toads, am I right?

(Reblogged from melthemagpie)

hellotailor:

staceythinx:

Rain or shine, macro photographer Vadim Trunov captures the surprisingly adventurous lives of snails.

SO MAJESTIC.

(Reblogged from hellotailor)
(Reblogged from tockthewatchdog)

spaceplasma:

Lunar Prospector

NASA’s Lunar Prospector spacecraft launched successfully on its way to the Moon from Launch Complex 46 (LC46) at Cape Canaveral Air Station on Jan. 6, 1998. It was the inaugural launch of Lockheed Martin’s Athena II launch vehicle and the first launch from LC46, operated by Spaceport Florida Authority. Lunar Prospector, built for the NASA Ames Research Center by Lockheed Martin, is a spin-stabilized spacecraft designed to provide NASA with the first global maps of the Moon’s surface and its gravitational magnetic fields, as well as look for the possible presence of ice near the lunar poles. It will orbit the Moon at an altitude of approximately 63 miles during a one-year mission.

(Reblogged from n-a-s-a)